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How To Be The Alpha Dog - Learn To Read Your Dog's Body Language

Author : Jared Wright


Many dog owners express their regret when it comes to being able to understand their pets. They don't understand how their pet is feeling in any given situation and it often makes it very difficult to react appropriately. While fairly complex, body language is fairly easy to learn and it will make your relationship with your dog much stronger.

Unfortunately, humans lack the ability to hold themselves like a dog would. We have no tails to wag, our ears are small and difficult to move, and we are usually standing upright instead of on all fours. Despite these limitations, it is still quite possible to use certain body language motions and techniques to get the message across to a dog.

It is important to establish yourself as the pack leader when you start to train your dog. The social structure of a wolf pack in instill in most dogs, therefore a dog owner must learn how the rules work for them in order to facilitate training. It is no doubt easier to train a puppy from young, older rescued or adopted dogs tend to be harder to train.

Dominance is a key element in the hierarchy structure of a dog or wolf pack. It is important for one dog among the pack to start leading and be dominance before the sense of structure sets in. A pack leader would want the best for its pack in his own ways. Unless you establish yourself as the alpha leader early, your dog might try to get that position.

There are some dominant positions one can use to help reinforce his alpha leader position. Since we walk on two legs, we are naturally much taller, and an alpha or pack leader will usually do what he can to make himself larger than the animal he wants to dominate. If your dog likes to jump up to be your size or if he takes advantage of a time when you are sitting or lying down on the floor, this is a sign that your dog does not respect you fully as his leader.

A dominant animal also has control over the other animals in the pack and if another animal is doing something that the alpha deems unnecessary or would rather not have happen, he can block the other animal simply by walking in his path or pushing him slightly out of the way. Another way an animal will tell another off is by giving him a little nip on the neck or back, not enough to cause any real pain, but simply a little reminder of who's in charge. Obviously, it is impossible for us to nip our puppies, however a quick soft slap on the body can work as well.

How your dog move his ears and tail also reveal a great deal of how he is feeling. Ears folded backwards behind the head mean that he is fearful, submissive or happy. Ears forward can be alertness, or nervousness. A dog wagging his tail downwards mean that he is submissive and happy where a dog wagging his tail upwards signal that he is dominance and excite.


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Dogs love habit and routine in their lives. They have expectations and form schedules for their feeding, potty and playing time. To find out more about canine dog training and other canine dog breeds, follow the links to visit CanineTouch.com now.

Article Source:
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Tags:   dog training, dog obedience training, dog body language, dog dominance

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Submitted : 2010-10-28    Word Count : 1    Times Viewed: 453